#Review Hazards in Hampshire (A British Book Tour Mystery) by Emma Dakin

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#Review Hazards in Hampshire (A British Book Tour Mystery) by Emma Dakin

Hazards in Hampshire (A British Book Tour Mystery)
by Emma Dakin

About Hazards in Hampshire

Hazards in Hampshire (A British Book Tour Mystery)
Cozy Mystery
1st in Series
Camel Press (October 15, 2019)
Paperback: Number of Pages 190
ISBN-10: 1941890601
ISBN-13: 978-1941890608
Digital ASIN: B07V2K7QTB

 

Moving to a quiet English village should have been tranquil, but Claire Barclay learns that even an invitation to tea can be deadly. Who killed Mrs. Paulson, the president of the local Mystery Books Club? Was the motive for murder located in the archives of the book club? The members of the books club might have reason to want Mrs. Paulson’s out of the way. She had lived in the village all her life, been involved in many organizations and societies and knew many secrets of the villagers. Was one secret too dangerous for her to keep? She had been wealthy and left her money to a member of the club. Could the legatee have been impatient for her inheritance? Who cared enough to want her dead? Claire, an expert in solving problems in her job as a tour guide, decides to delve into the archives and into the lives of the villagers—and find out.

Purchase Links –
Amazon | B&NKoboIndieBound

Now before I share my review of this wonderful story here is a little recipe from the author I would to share with you:

Claire Barclay, the protagonist in Hazards in Hampshire, takes her tourists to Crowborough in East Sussex, the home of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and the Crow and Gate Restaurant. The menu is impressive and includes fishcakes so I decided to try to create British style fishcakes that might be deserving of a place on that menu. Their menu calls for lobster and a Bouillabaisse sauce, but that is too expensive and too much work for me. I created one with white fish and a tarter sauce which just might sneak past the rigid standards of that establishment. The stimulus for the production was a visit from my sister. We see each other in Vancouver where she lives, but she rarely has time to hop the ferry and come to my house on the Sunshine Coast. She was coming and I needed to make lunch. I made this recipe ahead of time from a BBC (British Broadcasting Company) recipe, but tweaked it to suit me. I’m always doing that–only sometimes successfully.

First, I raided my vegetable garden for celery, potatoes, parsley and beans (The beans were for me as a side dish; my sister doesn’t like them). I used my mezzo luna to dice the vegetables. In Hazards in Hampshire Claire tells us that the mezza luna is one of her favourite cooking tools. Mine too.  

Fish Cakes with Sauce

Sauce

1/4 cup mayonnaise
1 tbsp capers
1 tbsp horseradish
1 tbsp Dijon mustard
1 tsp parsley, chopped
Mix it and set aside

Fish Cakes

Ingredients

2 bay leaves
½ cup
milk
½ cup water
.2 k or about ½ pound white fish. I used rockfish.
1 ½ cup raw potatoes (peeled)
¼ cup of diced celery
½ cup diced red pepper
¾ tsp lemon juice
1 tbsp chopped parsley
1 tbsp snipped chives
1 egg
Flour
Crushed crackers (I used Breton Originals) but almost anything would do included dry bread crumbs)

What to Do

Put fish in frying pan and pour water, milk and bay leaves over it. Cover and bring to boil, dropping to simmer for about 5 min. Take it off the heat and let it cool.

Bring potatoes to boil, then simmer for 10 minutes. Drain and put them back on the burner (turn it off first) to dry.  Mash them (Don’t let them stick) until they are light and fluffy. 

Take them off the burner and beat in 1 tbsp of the tartar sauce, add ¾ tsp lemon juice, 1 tbsp chopped parsley and 1 tbsp of snipped chives (I got those from my garden).

Mix well. Then flour a board and shape fish cakes on that board.  Place them in the beaten egg (on a plate–it’s easier than a bowl), then into the bread crumbs (also crushed onto a plate). 

Put in the fridge to set for a few hours or a day. 

Then fry in oil. 

We loved them. 

Emma

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

REVIEW

Welcome to the English Countryside, quaint little villages, stunning views and murder! Clair Barclay has moved back to England after years in Seattle, in the hope to start up her own Book Tour Company feautring the English Authors and their inspirations. Whilst getting settled in to her new home in the little village of Ashton-on-tich, she received an invite to attend afternoon tea with her neighbour Mrs Paulson. Only she wasn’t banking on finding her dead when she arrived for tea!

From here this quiet little villages becomes the centre of a murder investigation with many suspects – main from the local Mystery Books Club. But who would want her dead and why??

We get to see the English Countryside in all its glory when Clair takes charge of a group of four american ladies who have come to tour with her, we get quite a lot of time with these ladies and it was nice to have that side story along side the murder. Once the ladies return, that is when Claire really starts to investigate, starting with the Mystery Books Club, whom has quite a collection of Agatha Christie letters – she is hoping upon hope that maybe the clubs library may hold some hidden letter pertaining to Ms Christie’s period when she disappeared. Could this have been reason enough to kill Mrs Paulson?

Hazards in Hampshire, was a great start to this British Book Tour Mystery series and I can’t wait to read more from Emma Dakin, this was  good clean cozy mystery set in a wonderful location.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

About Emma Dakin

This is Emma Dakin’s first series, set in Britain the homeland of Emma’s grandparents. Emma channels her mother’s inherited English culture along with the attitudes and sayings of the modern Brits. She travels widely in England and at one point this May while travelling through the Yorkshire Moors she had all the tourists in a tour bus looking for a good place to hide a body. As Marion Crook, she has published many novels of adventure and mystery for young adult and middle grade readers as well as non-fiction for adults and young adults and non-fiction on social issues. Firmly in the cozy mystery genre now, and committed to absorbing the culture and changing world of Britain, she plans to enjoy the research and the writing of cozies.

Author Links

Webpage/Blog emmadakinauthor.com

Facebook http://tiny.cc/ilk3az

Goodreads http://tiny.cc/ttk3az

Purchase Links – Amazon Digital Amazon Paperback B&N Kobo IndieBound

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Fiona

I am Fee, a 30 -something SAHM bookworm! I love to read, and will read almost anything and everything. I am not afraid to try new genres of books and my main genre is horror, thriller.

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